For those of you who have attended, a Rosh HaShanah service (or watched one here on the Shalom Adventure magazine), a prominent practice you will observe is the blowing of a shofar, or ram's horn.   This practice is largely derived from the Biblical injunction in Leviticus 23 to observe this day with "blast of trumpets."  At many Rosh Hashanah services, it is not uncommon for the shofar to be "blasted" upwards of 100 times!

Read more ...

Water immersion (tevilah mikveh) ... repentance--and therefore forgiveness--is a predominant theme during Rosh Hashanah. ... Elul, the month preceding Tishri, is the beginning of a special 40-day period in which Jewish people prepare themselves for the intensified reflection, self-examination, and repentance that Rosh Hashanah, the Days of Awe, and Yom Kippur are characterized by.  During the last days of Elul, you will find in many Jewish synagogues special prayers for forgiveness--called Selichot--being offered by the penitent.

Read more ...

The Feast of Trumpets is the first of the fall feasts. It begins on the first day of the seventh month on the Hebrew calendar, known as Tishri.  It was a holy convocation, a ceremonial Sabbath; no work was to be done.

Read more ...