It takes 21.2 lbs of milk to make 1 lb of butter.
It takes 10 lbs of milk to make 1 lb of hard cheese.
It takes 12 lbs of milk to make 1 lb of ice cream.
It takes 11 lbs of milk to make 1 lb of non-fat dry milk.
It takes 7.4 lbs of milk to make 1 lb of dry whole milk.

Read more ...

Long before I became the Notmilkman, a favorite restaurant was Sylvia's on Malcolm X Boulevard in Harlem. Fast forward to 2016. I still enjoy dining in Harlem, minus Southern Fried Chicken, Deep-fried Coconut Shrimp, and Deep-fried Catfish of Sylvia fame at restaurants which have sprouted like fiddleheads in Harlem, representing the new "soul food" such as this one which I wrote about earlier this year:

Read more ...

Tomatoes are a common part of life for many people. We put them in sandwiches, salads, salsa, ketchup. Although it is technically a fruit the tomato is often treated as a vegetable due to its frequent use in savory dishes and was voted as “‘the most Israeli vegetable’”

Read more ...

Asparagus is an interesting vegetable. I am not sure how I would describe the flavor or what I would compare it to, it is just one of these things that you would have to try for yourself. But I do know that I like it and find it rather tasty and the health benefits provide now even more reasons to like it.

Read more ...

Making healthy eating choices is not easy. Often, we eat the wrong food, in the wrong quantity, at the wrong time. One of the main issues food can cause is mucus and pus forming in the body. All meat and dairy products cause the body to produce mucus, and should be avoided.

Read more ...

You have probably heard these sayings: “Life is uncertain. Eat dessert first.” “A balanced diet is a cookie in each hand.” “A man cannot live on chocolate alone, but a woman sure can.” Such common quotes reflect our love and desire for sugary products.1 In the United States the average individual consumes over 140 pounds of sugar annually, the equivalent of 50 teaspoons per day. That adds up to over 350 calories a day or 20 percent more than we consumed three decades ago. Unfortunately, it is prominently revealed in our hips and waistlines. Of that amount, 70+ pounds is “added” sugar, roughly 25 teaspoons every 24 hours.2 The “added” or “excess” sugars are those which are augmented by home cooks and commercial kitchens during processing of food and beverages.

Read more ...