Parasha for the Week:  Bemidbar: Numbers 1:1 – 4:20
Haftarah:  Hosea 2:1 – 22
Besorat Yeshua:   Mark 3:31 – 4:9

Overview:
The Book of Bemidbar — "In the desert" — begins with G-d commanding Moshe to take a census of all men over age twenty — old enough for service.
The count reveals just over 600,000. The levi'im are counted separately later because their service will be unique. They will be responsible for transporting the Mishkan (sanctuary) and its furnishings and assembling them when the nation encamps.
The 12 Tribes of Israel, each with its banner, are arranged around the Mishkan.
Since Levi is singled out, the tribe of Yosef is split into two tribes, Ephraim and Menashe.
When the nation travels, they march in a formation similar to the way they camp.

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Parasha for the Week:  Emor: Leviticus 21:1 – 24:22
Haftarah:  Ezekiel 44:15 - 31
Besorat Yeshua:   Mark 2:18 – 28

Overview
The Kohanim (priests) are commanded to avoid contact with corpses in order to maintain a high standard of ritual purity. They may attend the funeral of only their seven closest relatives: father, mother, wife, son, daughter, brother, and unmarried sister. The Kohen gadol (High Priest) may not attend the funeral of even his closest relatives.
Certain marital restrictions are placed on the kohanim.
The nation is required to honor the kohanim.
The physical irregularities that invalidate a Kohen from serving in the Temple are listed.

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Parasha for the Week:  Acharei Mot: Leviticus 16:1 – 18:30
Parasha for the Week:  Kedoshim:  Leviticus 19:1 - 20:27
Haftarah for the Week:  Ezekiel 22:1 – 22:19; Amos 9:7 - 15
Besorat Yeshua:  Mark 2:1 - 17

Overview : Acharei mot
G-d instructs the kohanim to exercise extreme care when they enter the Mishkan. On Yom Kippur, the kohen gadol is to approach the holiest part of the Mishkan after special preparations and wearing special clothing.
He brings offerings unique to Yom Kippur, including two identical goats that are designated by lottery. One is "for G-d" and is offered in the Temple, the other is "for Azazel" in the desert.
The Torah states the individual's obligations on Yom Kippur: On the 10th day of the seventh month, one must afflict oneself.

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Parasha for the Week: Tazriah: Leviticus 12:1 – 13:59
Parasha for the Week: Metsora: Leviticus 14:1 – 15:33
Haftara: 2 Kings 4:42 – 5:19; 7:3 - 20
Brit HaChadasha: Luke 2:21 - 39

Overview Tazriah:
The Torah commands a woman to bring a korban after the birth of a child.
A son is to be circumcised on the eighth day of his life.
The Torah introduces the phenomenon of tzara’at (often translated as leprosy) — a miraculous disease that attacks people, clothing and buildings.

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Parasha for the Week:  Shemini: Leviticus 9:1 – 11:47
Aftarah for the Week:  2 Samuel 6:1 – 7:17
Besorat Yeshua:  Romans 12: 16 - 21

Overview
On the eighth day of the dedication of the Mishkan (Sanctuary), Aharon, his sons, and the entire nation bring various korbanot (offerings) as commanded by Moshe.
Aharon and Moshe bless the nation.
G-d allows the Jewish People to sense His Presence after they complete the Mishkan.
Aharon's sons, Nadav and Avihu, present an offering of strange fire. They die on the spot, stressing the need to perform the commandments only as G-d directs.

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Parasha for the Week: Chol Hamoed Pesach

Overview
We interrupt the reading of the parashot (plural of parasha) during the Shabbat of the feasts. These Shabbatot (plural of Shabbat) called Chol Hamoed are dedicated to reading texts related to the feasts. The first night is celebrated with a special meal called the Seder which means “order” in Hebrew because everything is done according to a specific order to remember the Exodus and all the miracles G-d performed for Israel in Egypt.

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Parasha for the Week:  Vayikra: Leviticus 1:1 – 5:26
Aftarah for the Week:  Isaiah 43:21 – 44:23
Besorat Yeshua:  Romans 12: 1 - 3

Overview
The Book of Vayikra (Leviticus), also known as Torat Kohanim — the Laws of the Priests — deals largely with the korbanot (offerings) brought in the Mishkan (Tent of Meeting).
The first group of offerings is called korban olah, a burnt offering.
The animal is brought to the Mishkan's entrance.  The one bringing the offering sets his hands on the animal. Afterwards it is slaughtered and the kohen sprinkles its blood on the altar. The animal is skinned and cut into pieces. The pieces are arranged, washed and burned on the altar.
Various meal offerings are described. Part of the meal offering is burned on the altar, and the remaining part eaten by the kohanim. Mixing leaven or honey into the offerings is prohibited.
The peace offering, part of which is burnt on the altar and part is eaten, can be either from cattle, sheep or goats.

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